Skip to main content

Featured

AN OPEN GARDENS PREVIEW

It's going to be a quick one this week.  I've been busy primping and preening ready for the village open gardens on Sunday and I've not left myself much time to write this post.  After weeks of trying to squeeze extra things into my allotted six, I'm now going to have to be brief.  Ironic, no? Numbers one to four are the Long Border.  I've written about it before, and how I based it on Gertrude Jekyll's design for her garden at Munstead Wood.  She trained as an artist before she turned to gardening and was au fait with the latest colour theories.  She designed these borders to start with white and blue.......... Snapdragon, Delphiniums, Rue and Aruncus moving from pale to deeper yellow... Coreopsis, Achillea and Monarda Then it's on to the reds and oranges... Lychnis, Nasturtiums, Lilies before returning to yellow and then blue. Agapanthus, Clematis, Anthemis My number five spot goes to these tomatoes.  I may have found the answer to our Six on Saturday comp

The Lily and the Rose

 

'Within the garden's peaceful scene
Appeared two lovely foes,
Aspiring to the rank of queen,
The Lily and the Rose'

William Cowper                              


1. Tiger Lily

The exotic tiger lily with its dusting of freckles, threw back it's petals and announced its arrival at the garden party.  




They are sprinkled through the Long Border, with this group benefiting from a backdrop of purple leaves provided by Bishop of Auckland.


2. Rosa Wisley

Rosa Wisley is the first to announce its return after a mid summer rest.  I have several of the pale pink varieties of David Austin Roses.  I must admit that I find it a little hard to tell them apart, but they are all very pretty.


So is it the Lily or the Rose which deserves the crown?  Or, like Cowper, do you award it to both?

3. The Long Border

Meanwhile, down in the Long Border, the Rudbeckias, both fulgida 'Goldsturm' and laciniata 'Herbstsonne'  are powering up this week.  Cool blue Agapanthus at the far end and deep pink phlox at the near end provide some colourful contrasts.  




'Goldsturm' is such a reliable plant, spreading gently to produce a dense weed smothering carpet.





4. Pots and more pots


I often think, as I water the pots of an evening, that it would save me a bit of time if I didn't bother with them at all.  But the truth is that the garden would be a duller place without them.  There seem to be times in late Spring and just now when pots are the main providers of colour in the garden.





There are plants, like this Salvia 'Amistad' which wouldn't survive over winter in the ground, which seem happy in a pot.  


So having convinced myself that the pots should stay, I should get on with ordering some spring bulbs (if only I can whittle down the initial list to something more manageable).

5. Persicaria amplexicaulis 'Firetail'

This is one of those tough as old boots plants that spends most of the year as an unexciting mat of leaves, and then does this to remind me why it has garden room.  It does need corralling back into its space, from which it would cheerfully wander if given the chance.



6. Breakfast


After I've posted this I'm going to make myself a little breakfast.  The fruit from the strawberry plants in the greenhouse and the 'Autumn Bliss' Raspberries outside are supplemented by a few brought blueberries.  Yum!



That's all I have room for this week, but do check out The Propagator to see what's happening in other gardens from around the world.



Comments

  1. Beautiful views of your borders. I think I'd give the crown to the rose but only because you know you're in for a long and steady reign when it comes to flowering. I pondered having a lot less pots this year yet have somehow ended up with far more. They've helped create a border where it would be impossible to put a proper one. They are a pain to water though!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's a very good reason for the rose getting the crown.

      Delete
  2. My my, that's a healthy breakfast! I'm afraid weekends equal bacon sandwiches in our household!

    Last year I didn't really bother with pots and I hugely regretted it. Yours look lovely and as you say, some of the plants need to be moved to safety over the winter.

    The long border continues to look great :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think we have to reluctantly admit that pots are worth all the trouble of watering them.

      Delete
  3. I've been following your blog for a while now, not quite a year, and your long border seems to look fabulous all the time! Quite an achievement! I love the late summer tones you've got there right now. Enjoy your breakfast, it looks lovely and healthy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It gets going at the start of June and lasts until the frosts, but the paler sections are earlier so not much of interest there now.

      Delete
  4. I think they are joint winners! Your border looks wonderful, as do the pots. Enjoy your garden visit, I hope the weather is a little kinder than it is here.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Nothing quite like eating the produce from one's garden. Nice borders with attractive plant groupings.

    ReplyDelete
  6. The tiger lily is really a success! I often see them and I have resisted so far ... It will not be long!
    Very pretty flower borders : I like the R. 'Goldsturm' and you can even see the clematis in the background of Persicaria.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Your long border looks fabulous, I have had no joy in keeping Rudbeckias and I love them! Perhaps I should try them in pots, though like you, I am trying to downsize on the number I have. My only fruit success are blackberries and they are very nice with porridge! Enjoy your garden visit, it's been ages since we went anywhere, the roads here in Cornwall are so busy it makes going out a trial.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do like a nice blackberry too. Its a shame to hear your Rudbeckias are not playing ball.

      Delete
  8. The many pink-flowered David Austin roses are probably all worth space in the garden! I like your practice of sprinkling the Tiger Lilies through the borders, a far better arrangement than a large clump as we have here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The David Austin roses are all worth the garden room, but I must stop buying any more. Well not too many more.

      Delete
  9. I’m another one who keeps saying “no more pots” but with not being able to work during the pandemic I seem to have ended up with even more!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular Posts