A GREAT SUCCESS




It was our village Open Gardens last weekend and it was a great success.  I think we had in the region of 800 people visit, and there were teas to be enjoyed, the Rock Choir to entertain you, Classic Cars to admire and of course a few gardens to stroll around as well.




I was rather busy last week doing some panic weeding and last minute planting in the vegetable garden.  I did write a Six but didn't publish it because it became a rant about slugs, and I promise not to mention slugs this week.

My first Six is a bowl of strawberries.  These are delicious in my opinion, although other family members may think the big ones you get from the supermarket are superior.


Number 2 slot goes to Rosa Raubritter.  Much admired by our garden visitors as it was smothered in its perfect small cabbage roses.  So sweet.  It's a procumbent rose, so needs somewhere it can fall forward in an attractive manner.  




This is Salvia Verticillata 'Purple Rain' which I saw on a list of plants used by Piet Oudolf and thought if it's good enough for Piet, then I'm going to give it a try.  Well it turns out it is pure slug bait.  I put it in a pot for reasons I won't mention but may be to protect it from slug damage and hopefully it will get planted out in the Knot Garden where there is a space awaiting it.  I'm not yet sure whether this is better than other salvias.


The White border has moved on since we last saw it.  The Iceberg roses are out and have been joined by some feverfew.  


I must point out that I never planted this,  The seeds must have already been present in the soil, and rather like forget-me-nots is always with you whether you want it or not.  Since one volunteer is worth ten pressed men (nautical analogy alert) I have decided to encourage it.  


Ok, lets get back to roses for number 5 with the cheekily named Cuisse de Nymphe Emue (or Maiden's Blush if you're being coy).  This is the first year this has looked any good, so something about the mild weather has suited it.



To finish we have my little pot stand with it's Victorian pots (and one from The Newt) filled with some Morrisons fuchsias, a blue Nemesia, small leaved hostas and a double pink geranium.  Nothing particularly expensive or unusual, but I love the overall picture it makes.



 That's all for this week folks.  Want more - then perhaps you'd like to check out the other Six on Saturday posts hosted by Garden Ruminations ? 

Comments

  1. The header photo looks like a painting! It must have been beautiful, and I'm sure that your visitors must have appreciated your garden. (800 visitors, that’s not nothing… It must have been quite an organization...)
    In any case, well done (and also bravo for the strawberries😋)

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    1. We have a village team who put on the event with some great people in it. I'm not sure how many of the 800 came round our garden but it felt like most of them!

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  2. 800 visitors. Blimey. A lovely selection. I'm sure your homegrown strawberries taste far superior to the shop bought ones which always seem a bit hit and miss flavour-wise.

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  3. They taste great, but I will still pick the ones that have only been nibbled a bit by the slugs, and I think the families objections stem from that (understandably).

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  4. 800? Wow! That definitely was a great success, I bet you breathed a huge sigh of relief when that was over.
    On Jim's blog you asked about doing teas if you open your garden for the NGS. I've been to lots of NGS gardens where the tea stall is manned by supporters of a local charity, which therefore gets the proceeds. But I'm sure the NGS would be able to advise you, I doubt you'd be the first to be daunted by the prospect.

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    1. It was more fun than I thought it would be, as we had a steady stream of visitors rather than all at once. Thanks for sharing your experiences of the NGS - all food for thought!

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  5. What a treat for your visitors. I have Raubritter, everyone who sees it wants one. Great Maiden's Blush is such a delicate colour. We are British, we have no truck with nymphs' thighs here. I love these old roses.

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  6. What a great post to read through with memories of Nymphs' thighs in a previous garden. Your water colour poster is charming. I am sure all your visitors were wowed.

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  7. Ahh, I see the slugs are getting to you too! Your village Open Gardens must have been quite an event - such a lot of visitors! Rosa Raubritter is a beautiful rose and one that I will someday add to the border just in front of my study window. That border has a low wall that the rose could happily tumble over. Feverfew grows here too - I like it and leave it alone until I need the space. Your pot stand is lovely!

    PS - your strawberries will taste way more delish than the supermarket varieties!

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    1. That sounds like the perfect spot for Raubritter. It should look wonderful.

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  8. What a successful event! Your white border looks glorious and very calming and Maiden’s Blush is a desirable Rose. Wish I had room for more
    Ann - thequiltinggardener

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