LATE JANUARY IN THE GARDEN

It has been a challenge to find something different in the garden this week.  Temperatures have been quite low, and we had some more snow, so most of the plants have just stood still.  The snowdrops are still just beginning to flower and so are the oriental Hellebores.    Rain yesterday  left muddy splashes on the Lent Hellebores, so they weren't fit to be photographed either.  But luckily (or not!) I have still been able to find six garden things to share with you this week.


1. Cyclamen hederifolium 


One of the stunning sites which met us on our visit to Anglesey Abbey last September, was this carpet of Cyclamen hederifolium under the trees.  


Which has led to the purchase of more than a few (I'm not confessing how many to anyone!) cyclamen corms, which I'm hoping will establish themselves in the woodland garden here. Now I just need to work out which way up to plant them...



2. Water barrels


We had a fair old down pour a couple of days ago, and the water barrels are full to the brim.   I'm hoping for some more clement weather this week.   It's being stuck indoors looking at nurserymen's catalogues that leads to over ambitious purchases (see above).



3. Rose labels

As I've pruned the roses this year, I've also labelled them.  The more I've planted, the more difficult I've found it to remember which is which.  You write on these labels with pencil which becomes permanent after a time.



4. Sarcococca hookeriana var humilis

This is the dwarf version of Sarcococca, planted next to a path, so that I would get a waft of the beautiful fragrance as I walked by.  I hope it proves not to be too dwarf, as the wafting is probably only getting to knee level at present, and its not too pleasant bending down to have a sniff, what with all the mud there is around.


5. Beautiful branches

Devoid of leaves the bare branches twist and turn into wonderful forms.  This acer has lovely spreading branches.  Mr B loves to look at the trees bare branches too.  But he is eyeing up which ones can be judiciously pruned with his chain saw.  Not this tree though



6. CK Legend edging shears

I do like to include a post about my favourite garden tools now and then.  I have a lot of lawn to edge and in the more formal areas of the garden I want a neater finish than I can achieve with a strimmer.  I need edging shears that can tackle thick overgrown grass easily, for when it's all got a bit, well, overgrown, and these do the job very well.  They claim never to need sharpening, and so far so good in that respect.  They are quite heavy, but solidly made.



That's all from my garden this week.  I'm hoping the plants will be springing into action soon.  The birds are telling us that Winter is nearly over - they've started singing.  

As always, thanks to the The Propagator for hosting Six on Saturday, filled with interesting gardens from around the world.





Comments

  1. Anglesey Abbey is a place I would love to visit. I grow Galanthus 'Anglesey Abbey' here, an old variety and interesting. I'm with you on your choice of labels which I'm guessing are from Alitags. I use a smaller version for snowdrops and find them excellent. For permanency I have taken to scribing the names with a small electric drill and scribe fitting - very quick and easy, as easy as writing. You will never be short of Cyclamen hederifolium for those you are planting will self-seed generously. Many years ago as a student in a boarding school I was put to edging lawns with one of those shears and absolutely hated the slow pace. Nowadays I use a battery-powered strimmer to do the job here.

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    1. Well spotted Paddy - they are from Alitags, and I like your idea of scribing the names on. I'm not surprised to hear you hate using shears after being made to do it at school. I have a similar aversion to team sports.

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    2. Give me manual tools any time....but I have plenty of time for the garden.

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  2. This river of cyclamen is amazing! Normally you should have great success planting your cyclamen corms in the shade. Good luck !

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    1. I'm hoping the squirrels don't take a fancy to them.

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  3. I'm not surprised you were inspired by Anglesey Abbey display, it looks spectacular. Lovely shaped acer, guard it well! I must get out and prune my roses this week, nice labelling. Stay safe and warm.

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    1. Thanks Gill. There's a wind chill of -3 C out there at the moment, so I'm staying warm by staying indoors.

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  4. I think I have the dwarf version of Sarcococca and it's fragrance is wafting around happily now it has got a bit bigger. I really must label my roses as you have done. You're right about the connection between bad 'stay indoors' weather and online plant purchasing!

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    1. I'm glad to hear the Sarcococca do grow bigger.

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  5. Those corms are very confusing aren't they? I'm never certain I've got things the right way up . It'll be wonderful if you can create something like that display at Anglesey Abbey - so beautiful!

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    1. fingers crossed that it will work, unlike the orchard of crocus where not a one came up.

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  7. You've risen to the challenge to fine interesting things at end of January. I'm adding cyclamen to my wishlist.

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    1. It does get to be a bit of a challenge this time of year.

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  8. Loved my half moon edging tool and my long handled shears...but they didn't stop me getting rid of all the lawn, which in a small garden you have to do if you need more space to grow more plants.

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    1. Very true. I keep removing more and more of our lawn to make room for more plants.

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  9. What a lovely cyclamen display and inspiration for you. What do you think of Compassion btw? I've got one, in her second year, she's vigorous and is already near the top of the pergola. I must get a pair of edging shears and aim for neater edges!

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    1. I think it's a very good rose. Vigorous, as you say, and the stems can be quite stiff so you have to train them in as they grow or they get too woody to bend. It's got a great scent and a lovely soft colour. The hybrid tea shape of the blooms is not my favourite form, but it is still attractive in a bit of a retro 1950s way. It does get black spot, and I do spray them, but it doesn't loose too many leaves.

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    2. Yes I agree - I find the blooms a bit big and blousy (1950's is a good way of putting it!) but the scent is nice. Mine gets a bit of blackspot too, I just remove the unsightly leaves, seems to flower away regardless.

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