THE GARDEN IN MID MARCH

The middle of March, almost, and there seems to be a change of mood in the garden.  The weather is slowly warming, although there are still cold winds and sharp showers, but the change is noticeable in the growth that the plants are making.  Weeds are appearing too, of course, which is another sign that the ground must be warming up.  ... and the grass could do with mowing.

1. Daffodils


This little grouping of daffodils are along side the driveway.  I rather like the pale colour and the frilled trumpets.  I've done some research to try to identify them, and I think they are Ice Follies.

2. Berberis darwinii

The flower buds on this Berberis have appeared this week.  I like it at this stage.  As the flowers get more prominent I think the colour becomes less attractive: less burnt orange and more egg yolk.


3. Euphorbia Wulfenii

Jolly lime green heads light up this corner of the garden like torches.


4.  White Tulips

In this border I planted out some tulips that were in pots last year.  I think they are Fosteriana Purissima.



5. Mystery plant

I didn't know what this plant was, so I got out my Observer's Book of  Wild Flowers.   It's Coltsfoot, which 'may be found in waste cultivated places, especially where the soil is stiff and clayey'.  It's got interesting downy scales on its stems.  Unfortunately it seems to be a 'problem weed', so I'll have to get the spade out.



6. Dry Stone Wall


 Mr Baileyana has built a fine dry stone wall where the Rose Garden abuts the gravel terrace.    It replaces a retaining wall had been formed from sleepers which, being many years old, had begun to rot away.  He used stones that we found in a pile at the top of the garden. 



I'm almost certain these stones must have come from here in the first place.  It's strange to think of one set of owners moving all the stones laboriously from one end of the garden to the other, only for the next set of owners to move them all back again. 

That's all from my garden this week, but if you'd like to see more from gardens in the UK and beyond, then please visit The Propagator, who is kind enough to host Six on Saturday.  If you'd like to take part in Six on Saturday yourself, then all the instructions you need are there.

Comments

  1. What a great find those stones were! The wall looks great, as do the white tulips (super wow!) & daffs. As to horrible weeds in the garden, if they bloom, they stay for that bit, then are subsequently removed in my garden. Pollinators don't know the diff & only my neighbours object!

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    1. I did a bit more reading up and found that the roots of Coltsfoot can go down go 1m, so I did get out the spade. The roots didn't go down that far, but they had sent out white brittle roots 1 -1.5m long spreading out in all directions. They've taken me all afternoon to dig out and I know I will have missed some bits. Heed my warning and if you see one of these serve it with an eviction notice straight away.

      Thankyou for the kind comments about the wall and tulips.

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  2. I do like a nice dry stone wall, just like yours! I often think that the best part of the flower is the bud, your berberis looks lovely. I can forgive it its horrid spines. :)

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  3. That dry stone walling is a triumph. I have to attempt some down by my pond garden. Fortunately the stone are much smaller than your OH must have had to handle! I'm a big fan of berberis - mine too is about to explode its molten lava coloured flowers. Can't wait.

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    Replies
    1. Those stones were quite heavy. I did worry he was going to bust the wheelbarrow at one point.

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  4. Just wanted to apologise to anyone who wanted to leave a comment but can't . I don't know why it won't let you as the settings should allow you to.

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  5. The daffodils running along the stone wall paint a lovely picture. I love the delicacy and colour of the daffodils above the weight and strength of the wall.

    Gorgeous flowers on the Berberis, it would be nice if they colour stay that colour wouldn’t it. Love they way you have described the Euphorbias as torches - I’m sure they must almost allow on a dull day.

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  6. I was just wishing for some Wulfenii Euphorbia and there it is! I have never seen the Berberis looks great to me...how wonderful to have stone and someone to build a wall for you, I love and miss walls like that. Florida only has some limestone and coral, all white!

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