MAGNOLIAS, DAFFODILS AND TULIPS

In the UK we are in lock down and although it's difficult adjusting to our new reality, thankfully we are all safe and well here.   However trips to the garden centre are off the cards for the foreseeable future.  The seeds want pricking out and cuttings want potting on.  It's time I planted the first early potatoes.  How one regrets not having plenty of bags of compost and plant feed.  But we shall make do with what we have.

In this post I'll put aside for a few minutes worries about Coronavirus, and write about some of the beauties of spring.

1. Tulip Flaming Prince

The first of the tulips that I planted up in pots last Autumn are up.  I love the Dutch flower paintings which include the special broken tulips, that commanded such high sums, that fortunes were made and lost speculating on them.  I wanted tulips with the same feathered markings, so thought I would try these.




2. Magnolia Soulangeana

We've had beautiful weather this week and it's been wonderful to be outside in the sunshine.  The flipside of this is of course frosty nights.  I have two Magnolia Soulangeana in the garden.  This younger one has escaped the worst of it, but on the larger one all the flowers have been browned, which is a shame.  


3. Pieris Forest Flame

There are mature Pieris in the garden, much taller than me.  They had beautiful tufts of bright red leaves atop each branch.  I waited too long to take a photo, and found they had also succumbed to the frost.  The flowers, however, were untouched.


4. Training Climbing Roses

I finished tying in the Rosa Compassion on the rose arch.  I've tried to retain as many branches as I could and get as full a coverage of the sides of the structure as I could manage given that it has very stiff branches.  Here's hoping for a good display this summer.


5. Narcissus Actaea

A very refined Narcissus.  The epitome of good taste.  No yellow trumpets allowed here.  



Only joking!  I've got the yellow ones too.



6. Tulips in the Rose Garden

White lily tulips surround Mercury, while the rose bushes spring into leaf.




That's all from my garden this week.  We can't go out and visit gardens at present, but you can visit them virtually by following  The Propagator, who kindly hosts Six on Saturday.

Comments

  1. I love the pheasants eye daffs, they are very elegant as you say. Lovely name for a rose, 'Compassion', and of course a great sentiment. Have a good week, stay safe and well x

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  2. I think I'll be getting some Original Poet's daffodils soon. I think. I thought that before and it turned out they were Tete-a-Tete, but the Poet's bloom later, and I have some new plants sprouting. They look amazing.

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    1. Your right that the Actaea look identical to the Peasants Eye (aka Poeticus) but they come into flower earlier. Hopefully yours will be long soon.

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  3. I see that the young leaves of your Pieris have burnt because of the frost ... What a pity ... You must have had lower temperatures than here (only -0,5° this week)
    But it's not over because Monday Tuesday and Wednesday we are going again! Pretty six, these tulips are beautiful

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    1. It was a shame about the Pieris, but reflects the weather we had recently, getting pleasantly warm and then the frosts. Still got the flowers to admire, but your photo of them was amazing.

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  4. Your garden looks fabulous in the last photo, looking past Mercury and into the wooded area with the sunlight shining through the trees. And yes, the daffs are charming.

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    1. Thanks Jane. Real proper bright sunshine it was. I had to use my hand to shade the camera lens as I don't have one of the gadgets that fit on the end of the lens, and I've never had to do that before. Perhaps you spotted the bright yellow daffs in the background of that photo.

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  5. Nice job with the rose. I have that one too, and was pleased to remember I took a cutting last year which is doing nicely. Should be able to plant it out this winter. If I can find a spot for it...

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  6. Love those Narcissus Actaea - I planted some similar ones, but mine are not in flower yet. Leaves, yes! You have a lovely garden. Fresh rose growth is so beautiful in the sunlight, before it succumbs to black spot etc.

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  7. Flaming Prince is beautiful, as is that Narcissus. I look forward to seeing the rose in bloom later in the year. You've reminded me that I'm nearly out of liquid seaweed feed. I may look into ordering some online, although I won't need to feed the tomatoes for a few months yet.

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    1. Our local garden centre has decided to offer contactless delivery, so I'm going to give that a go.

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  8. O, how you must groan at what the frost has taken, but in truth, it's left plenty behind. Love the white tulips around Mercury.

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    1. The roses don't seem to have been 'got' by the frost at all. It's odd what does and doesn't catch it. The white tulips have managed to survive from previous years which is good cos so many of them don't make a reappearance.

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  9. The tulips in the rose bed are beautiful and I love that they're white, it adds a lovely delicacy to the area. That's something I must keep in mind for next year. I do love your 'very refined Narcissus'.

    Rosa Compassion will be beautiful climbing over your arch, I look forward to seeing it in summer.

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    1. I put a few purple ones in too last year and I think it was a mistake. I should have stuck to white. Rosa Compassion will probably feature at lot as I love taking photos which use the arch as a frame.

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