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A COOL START

 Temperatures are expected to get into the 30s again today but this morning I’ve been for a walk around the garden and it felt lovely and fresh and cool with a little mist in the air. I hope the plants have also benefited from this respite from the heat.  This is a view of the shady end of the rose garden looking towards the oak tree and the rhododendron borders it’s looking a bit autumnal   The persicaria is flowering. It’s a bit of a thug and wood happily make a move to take over the whole border but I keep a close eye on it and make sure it behaves itself.  I bought it from a NGS garden as ‘son of firetail’. They certainly had plenty of it for sake.  The roses have started to repeat flower. This is Margaret Merril just opening and looking much more like Champagne Moment.  Now back to reality with a bit of a bump. Those rhododendrons under the oak tree are suffering. I would guess they have been there since the 1970s at least and could be older. They don’t like this weather and have

ROSES OLD AND NEW

It has been very, very hard to whittle down this weeks selection to Six things only.  As usual there will be some minor cheating in counting, otherwise it would be 100% roses and I thought you might like a couple of things that aren't.  It's been such lovely weather this week.  Here is the sun rising over the Rose Garden.


Starting with the roses then, here is Rosa 'Raubritter', bred by Kordes in the 1930s.  It's a low growing rose ideal for tumbling over a low wall like this.  I saw it growing by the central pool at Mottisfont Rose Garden, which I fell for it's clusters of perfect miniature cabbage roses.


The next photograph has Rosa 'Gentle Hermione' in the middle, blending into Iceberg at one end and Queen of Sweden at the other.  All these will repeat flower.


Another pale and interesting combination of roses, but ones which flower once, are in this shadier bed, where they are quite happy.  On the left is Konigin von Danemark, an Alba rose of 1826,and on the right is a white rose, Madame Hardy, a Damask rose bred in 1832.






My next picture of rosy abundance , has Rosa 'Munstead Wood' in the centre.  It has gorgeous dark red flowers and is a good one for the front of the border, being not too tall.



So that's four-ish posts done, and time for something other than roses.  This is geranium 'Buxton Blue' .  Its always a bit enthusiastic, but this year it's gone completely mad. There are grow through plant supports under there somewhere, but they have evaded the metal girdles and are letting it all hang out.





My final non-rosy post goes to Globe Artichokes.  Greeted with much excitement and melted butter by the inhabitants of Castle Hortus.




And that's it.  We are done for this week.  Next weekend the garden will be open on Sunday 3rd July as part of Gonalston Open Gardens, and I'm hoping for good weather, not just for the visitors, but so I can get all that final primping and preening done.

Thanks as always to the Propagator for hosting Six on Saturday.
















Comments

  1. Wow the Rosa 'Raubritter' is stunning, I love the shape of the flower heads.

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    1. I just looked up the meaning of the name as I don't speak German. 'Robber Baron' apparently - how odd.

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  2. Magnificent roses. Interested to read about your two that do well in shadier conditions, I have a hopeless white rose which I'd like to replace and Madame Hardy looks like a contender. Does she smell nice?

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    1. She smells nice but the fragrance is light. I read somewhere that most of the once flowering roses will take some shade, and that the Albas are the most shade tolerant of them.

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  3. The roses are looking perfect, and thank you for sharing your inspirations for growing certain roses in various places in the garden

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  4. What beautiful roses you have! I didn't know the term "cabbage rose" but the shape is quite appropriate.
    I had spotted the pretty geranium on the first photo, thank you for highlighting it on the last one. Artichokes are also on the menu tomorrow! Enjoy your meal

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    1. It's interesting how these names like 'cabbage rose' exist in one language but not another. Of course a rose is much prettier than a cabbage!

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  5. Mmm, artichokes! I love them but they are tricky to grow where I am - plant too early and they get killed by a late frost. Plant too late and you don't get any artichokes before fall. Sad!

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    1. The artichokes are hardy here so are perennial. I'm sorry to hear they aren't where you are.

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  6. Lovely roses and views of your garden. Looking at your standard roses in the first photo I wonder if I've been chopping some of mine too hard back each spring. They put on so much growth as a result that most seem a bit leggy and lax rather than forming a nicer, rounded shape like yours.

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    1. I have toned down the pruning of the standards over the years, because I also found that they can grow too tall. I had to cut off some of the stems one year as I thought they would just keel over.

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  7. Very nice to be reminded of 'Raubritter', one of the very few roses we've ever had in our garden and enjoyed while it lasted. Cornwall is not kind to roses generally.

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    1. I had thought the Cornish climate was supposed to be wonderful (since it's such a popular holiday destination) so it's been a revelation to read about the realities from you and Jude. I'm sure it has its upsides too for your Camellias.

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  8. Your roses are divine. Rosa 'Raubritter' is such a beauty!

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  9. thequiltinggardener26 June 2022 at 20:42

    The Geranium is an absolute picture. Good luck with your open day, I wish I was nearer.

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    1. If you're ever in my neck of the woods and fancy popping round, give me a shout.

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  10. Wow glorious 🌹 roses! Raubritter is on my Rose buying list (a rather long one). I am blissfully going through rose catalogues now in our winter. A happy pass time. I'm off to plant some more roses in my garden, today it's Crepescule and Mutabilis. 💞🌸💮

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