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A COOL START

 Temperatures are expected to get into the 30s again today but this morning I’ve been for a walk around the garden and it felt lovely and fresh and cool with a little mist in the air. I hope the plants have also benefited from this respite from the heat.  This is a view of the shady end of the rose garden looking towards the oak tree and the rhododendron borders it’s looking a bit autumnal   The persicaria is flowering. It’s a bit of a thug and wood happily make a move to take over the whole border but I keep a close eye on it and make sure it behaves itself.  I bought it from a NGS garden as ‘son of firetail’. They certainly had plenty of it for sake.  The roses have started to repeat flower. This is Margaret Merril just opening and looking much more like Champagne Moment.  Now back to reality with a bit of a bump. Those rhododendrons under the oak tree are suffering. I would guess they have been there since the 1970s at least and could be older. They don’t like this weather and have

SUNSHINE AND SNOW

The week began with some snow.  I was excited and grabbed my camera to head out and take some snowy pictures.  It was a vey quick session - Brrr.


I love it when the fir trees get a dusting of snow.   Did I say we lived in the Swiss Alps?  When you've finished skiing, you must pop over for some emmental fondue.



This fern looked rather decorative in its white robes.


The snow didn't stay for long, and Thursday was bright and sunny.  I bent down to take a photo of these Nigella  seed heads to find that one little late comer had decided to flower.


Of actual gardening there was little to be done this week.  The last of the tulip bulbs have gone into the borders.  A few leaves were cleared away in the Rose Garden, but much remains to be done in that department this weekend.  The Dahlias, which were drying in the greenhouse have mostly been packed away in dry spent compost.  I hope they haven't suffered from getting too cold.  I'm taking comfort from the fact that we are told it is the wet that is more of a problem.

None of those activities make an interesting photo, but my eye was taken by the red stems of this Persicaria 'Red Dragon' which has keeled over in the cold.


By contrast, this Thyme seems completely unaware of the weather .  It forms a fluffy little hedge round the base of these obelisks.  This plant seems to self seed very happily in the gravel, and these plants were all 'freebies'.  


I would otherwise have chosen box, but with all its troubles, I thought these made a good alternative.


For my final picture, how about a bit of sunshine?  When it gets dark so early, it's nice to see some sun while it's light and it highlights the lovely shape of the branches on this Acer pseudoplantanus.


 That's all I have time for this week, but don't forget to check out the Propagator who kindly hosts Six on Saturday.

Comments

  1. Lovely photos of your garden in the snow, yes I would love to pop over for some emmental fondue! Also think the combo of thyme, white obelisks and gravel is lovely, much more interesting and more aromatic than box, you've even got enough for several bouquet garni there.

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  2. Very nice snowy pictures ! We haven't had (yet) here and I enjoy seeing other people's photos!

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    1. It's lovely when it's just fallen and is all pristine.

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  3. Your garden is looking great both covered in snow, and when that has melted those bare trunks reflect the light beautifully.

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  4. So agree that the thyme and the obelisk works really well. And the nigella picture is so lovely too. No snow here yet but it does make the garden look magical.

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    1. I can guess that 'Unknown' is you 😊 Thanks for the kind comments.

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  5. I must remember to add N20gardener to the end of my comments!

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  6. That's probably the best sort of snow - here today and gone tomorrow snow that prettifies everything briefly without outstaying its welcome. Lovely views and I especially like the Nigella one.

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    1. I totally agree. Brown and slushy isn't such a good look.

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  7. Other people’s gardens always look lovely with a dusting of snow but I hate seeing it in mine. The tree trunks look beautiful in the sunshine

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    1. Thanks for your kind comment. I hope the snow misses you this winter.

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