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AN OPEN GARDENS PREVIEW

It's going to be a quick one this week.  I've been busy primping and preening ready for the village open gardens on Sunday and I've not left myself much time to write this post.  After weeks of trying to squeeze extra things into my allotted six, I'm now going to have to be brief.  Ironic, no? Numbers one to four are the Long Border.  I've written about it before, and how I based it on Gertrude Jekyll's design for her garden at Munstead Wood.  She trained as an artist before she turned to gardening and was au fait with the latest colour theories.  She designed these borders to start with white and blue.......... Snapdragon, Delphiniums, Rue and Aruncus moving from pale to deeper yellow... Coreopsis, Achillea and Monarda Then it's on to the reds and oranges... Lychnis, Nasturtiums, Lilies before returning to yellow and then blue. Agapanthus, Clematis, Anthemis My number five spot goes to these tomatoes.  I may have found the answer to our Six on Saturday comp

Orange leaves, Red leaves, Frosted leaves

Though hast thy music too, says Keats in his Ode to Autumn.  It's a chance to look at up at the trees and notice their changing colours, and admire how lovely they are.  Just don't think about all the raking up there will be later  The orange brown leaves are on a Sessile Oak (I think!).


The autumn colour continues along this path, from the red of the Rhododendron luteum to the yellows of the Hosta.


On Thursday I started to tidy away the pots into the greenhouse and turfed the strawberry plants outside.  After a season of indoor growing the windows are absolutely filthy.  There were no frosts forecast for the next week, so thought I was being a bit premature.

You can guess what's coming next.


Friday morning - a ground frost.  The thermometer in the greenhouse recorded 0.9C.  The frost looks so pretty.


But of course, it has put an end to the Dahlias and tender annuals.  The flower of Glory of Heemstede looks fine, but the blackened leaves tell a different story.

The leaves on the Japanese acer are turning a fiery red, although my camera was drawn to the twisting curves of the branches hiding beneath.


It is of course, bulb planting time, and now the weather is turning colder, it will be time to get on and plant the tulips.  I've a fancy selection of rich toned doubles from Sarah Raven to grace some pots, and budget bulk buys from Parkers for the borders - Tulip Burgundy for the Knot Garden and Tulip Purissima (White Emperor) for the front garden.  

That's all for this week but don't forget that more garden relating chat can be found on the Propagator, the host of Six on Saturday.














Comments

  1. Lovely autumnal scenes. The leaves and twisting boughs of the Japanese acer are stunning.

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  2. This Japanese maple really has a stunning shape with its twisting curves of its branches.. I love it !
    When you say that "you turfed strawberries": I don't really understand ... How do you do it and what is it for? Is it like a mulch to feed them or protect them?

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    1. I understand your confusion. 'Turfed out' is an expression which means that you forcibly eject someone or something. I don't know where the phrase comes from, but perhaps it is connected to turf cutting.

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    2. Oh ! I now understand what you mean. Thank you !

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  3. Perfect autumn shots! That frost was a bit of a shock here too. I wasn't prepared at all. Poor plants.

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    1. I thought we had had a good run but I see that I wasn't writing a frosty post until nearly the end of November last year.

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  4. The twisting branches have my eye too, a delightful acer. Yes winter has started for us gardeners in the UK.

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  5. I've been away all week but I don't think we've had a frost here in Brussels yet. Your frosted leaves looks so pretty that I almost wish for one. Better than a soggy lawn.

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    1. I do like to take a good frosty photo if I'm up early enough that is.

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  6. I do love the acer. What a fabulous contorted shape.

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  7. A fine selection of autumn colour. Your weather sounds pretty similar to ours - just above freezing in the greenhouse overnight. Brrr!

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    1. Beautiful pictures, especially the Acer. The frosts caught me out as well but at least it’s back to milder weather for a while.

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