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AN OPEN GARDENS PREVIEW

It's going to be a quick one this week.  I've been busy primping and preening ready for the village open gardens on Sunday and I've not left myself much time to write this post.  After weeks of trying to squeeze extra things into my allotted six, I'm now going to have to be brief.  Ironic, no? Numbers one to four are the Long Border.  I've written about it before, and how I based it on Gertrude Jekyll's design for her garden at Munstead Wood.  She trained as an artist before she turned to gardening and was au fait with the latest colour theories.  She designed these borders to start with white and blue.......... Snapdragon, Delphiniums, Rue and Aruncus moving from pale to deeper yellow... Coreopsis, Achillea and Monarda Then it's on to the reds and oranges... Lychnis, Nasturtiums, Lilies before returning to yellow and then blue. Agapanthus, Clematis, Anthemis My number five spot goes to these tomatoes.  I may have found the answer to our Six on Saturday comp

GARDENING IN A HEAT WAVE

It's been a trifle warm here of late, and the watering can has been pressed into action.  Only a little gardening has been done as by mid morning its been too hot for me.  It's not just the temperatures that have been rising, the colours have been getting hotter too.


1. The Long Border

This vibrant splash of red provides plenty of late July colour in the Long Border.



The Monarda is practically subdued compared to this hot pink and orange combination further along the border,  It's a 'red' phlox and a double orange Day Lily.






2. Box

The hot dry weather gave me an ideal opportunity to trim the Box topiary in the Potager.  Hopefully the nasty box blight doesn't get the chance to muscle in.  The box in the rest of the garden still awaits my attention as I got blisters from using the topiary shears.  Nothing else seems to give such a neat finish.


3. Rosa Ruby Celebration

The Rose garden has been filled with the scent of roses and I also rather like the smell of box, although I don't think it appeals to everyone.  These crimson standard roses are the dominant feature in this border.  These roses make me think of the Queen of Hearts in Alice in Wonderland  for some reason, as if the playing cards had just finished painting them red.

(We have the hedgehogs necessary for the game of croquet, but sadly no flamingos).


4. Rosa Queen of Denmark


Another rose which was looking great this week was Queen of Denmark (Konigin von Danemark).  This a lovely mid pink rose ( rather bleached out by the sun in this photo) with a true rose scent, and being an Alba is one that doesn't get black spot.


This close up gives a more accurate picture of the colour (but you still won't get the scent, sorry).



5. Kitchen Garden News

Firstly - here is the Summer pudding I made with some of the fruit I picked last week.  It was as delicious as it looks, if I say so myself.




This little plateful summarises what's been ready to eat this week.  The tomato is Marmande, the first one to be ready apart from two cherry toms which didn't really count.



6 Pots, pots, pots

Do you remember those miniscule plug plants I bought in the Spring?  Those little babies are all grown up and filling out this urn on the front terrace.


Whereas round by the back door the pots provide perfect cover for a first venture outside.


That's all from my garden for this week.  Thanks as always to the Propagator for hosting Six on Saturday.  

Comments

  1. I love the hot colours of high summer, and yours are looking fab - I really like the phlox, daylily and achillea combo and your roses are still looking really good, mine seem to be pretty much done by now (except for Compassion), so am rather jealous. The summer pudding photo literally made my mouth water! And kitten: so cute!

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    1. In return I have to point out that your roses were in flower before mine, and I was rather jealous then!

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  2. The garden is on fine form! The long border looks absolutely perfect - pretty much what you imagine when you picture a herbaceous border.

    You're right about topiary shears - sometimes I use the hedge trimmer if there's a lot to get through, but it never looks as good as doing it properly.

    Lovely looking pudding. It's such a great time of year!

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    1. It certainly is a great time of year. Just like you I've tried the hedge trimmers on some of the hedges, but they don't seem to like it and sit there with their browning leaves.

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  3. I've not had a summer pudding in years. It looks delicious. Your garden is looking stunning: lots of vibrant colours. I also end up with blisters when using by hand shear things with Box (the same shears I use for edging the lawns) but they do a good job.

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  4. I'm so impressed by the summer pudding! Do you have it with cream or ice cream? Just so I can get the complete picture. Lovely long border, I am very fond of monarda and these have made a wonderful big stand. The Queen of Hearts image is perfect. I will send flamingos.

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    1. I'm not a huge fan of cream, but just a little is perfect. Clotted cream is the best in my opinion.
      Isn't Six on Saturday wonderful - there's the chance to swop seeds, growing tips and exotic birds!

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  5. What stunning shots of your border and your archway! Your pots have matured perfectly too. My harvest this week has been kale and spinach. Not as colourful as your selection but tasty.

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    1. Thanks Granny. Your harvest does sound yummy.

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  6. Your crimson roses are beautiful and your comment made me think of this post
    https://traveltalk.me.uk/2015/08/22/today-was-a-good-day/
    Your tiny plugs have fared a lot better than mine which are still tiny!

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    1. I loved the link - thankyou. Sorry to hear your little plugs are taking their time.

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  7. Oh, we must make a summer pudding - it has escaped our mind this year. Delia Smith is the only one for summer pudding!

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    1. I've always used Katie Stewart's but adjusted the fruit to suit what I have in. She uses mostly redcurrants with raspberries and strawberries but no blackcurrants. I've just looked up Delia's since you mentioned it and it sounds very nice, so I will give that one a try next time.

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  8. When do you recommend pruning boxwood? Do you prefer hot and dry weather rather than wet and cool weather? I need to do mine soon and I'm waiting for your advice.
    Very pretty monarda very floriferous on the first photo!

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    Replies
    1. I’ve seen hot and dry weather recommended because blight is less prevalent then but I don’t know if there are proper scientific trials to back that up.

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