Cyclamen and Primrose

We've had a few good bright gardening days this week, and it has been a pleasure to spend most of the day outside and not get frozen.  The birds have been singing away merrily in the woodland as I planted the autumn flowering cyclamen I featured last week.


1. Cyclamen coum

This week I have a Spring flowering Cyclamen for you.  Unfortunately these seem to attract the attentions of the squirrels who love to dig up anything vaguely conkerish .  I'm hoping they are less attractive once they are in growth, but just in case, I took a photo of them as soon as they were planted.

The flowers are so pretty and delicate that they don't seem quite fit for the rigours of garden life.  I've placed some near a pink hellebore to pick up on the colour.  But not near enough to get a decent photo of the two together.  Duh!



2. Economical Primula

We all have our little peculiarities, and one of mine is a reluctance to spend money on seasonal bedding. As the plants are intended to have a limited life, I can't help thinking that they are poor value for money compared to perennials.  I know I am wrong, as seasonal displays can be very attractive and bring a lot of pleasure.  

So with great economy, these primulas are rehomed into a spare piece of border each Summer, waiting in the wings, to be planted back in these urns each Winter.  They don't seem to mind at all.


3. Primroses

I chose, for my pots, the least fancy primulas that I could find, but they are not a patch on the simplicity of a primrose.  Not far from the house, primroses happily grow on sunny banks, but there was not a single one in the garden.  There is now, and although this is the only one in flower, there are also signs of regrowth from a few more that were planted last year.




4. Snowdrops

The first of the snowdrops are open although there are many more to come.  A little more warm weather and they should all be out.  The forecast for next week is very cold.  Patience will be required.


5. Double snowdrops

The doubles open before the singles. 



The doubles can be a little scruffy the centres with the petals being of uneven lengths.  This one had a lovely rosette of petals hidden within in.  None of my snowdrops are special or rare, but there are thousands of them, so it is possible to find some that are a bit different from the others.



6 Seed sowing

Yes it's that time of year again.  The tomato seeds are sown.  Here are this year's selection.  The Marmande are out of date, but I gave them a try anyway.  No cherry tomatoes yet.  Come on Marshalls - get a move on sending out your orders.



Marmande, Moneymaker, Roma and Black Russian


That's all from my garden for this week.  If the weather is keeping you indoors this weekend, then you might like to browse the other Six on Saturday contributions on The Propagator.



Comments

  1. I love the sweep of snowdrops and I do the same as you - place the primroses somewhere safe and cool for the summer and re-introduce them to the garden and tubs in autumn/winter. If I can keep the snails away, they're fine.

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    1. I'm glad it's not just me! It took me a while to realise they could be kept and reused.

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  2. The snowdrops around the birch are perfectly fabulous - the very best way to grow snowdrops, to make an impact in the garden, as garden plants, rather than lone individuals in little pots as is so often seen. I'm with you completely on buying "disposable/seasonal" plants, a reason I grow very few annuals. It just seems wasteful of time, effort and money to grow short-lived plants when one could have something which goes on for years for similar outlay.

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    1. I was very lucky to inherit a garden so well supplied with snowdrops. All I have to do is divide the clumps and spread them around.

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  3. Beautiful naturalistic planting with the snowdrops, they look so at home. I agree with you on the primula-primrose divide, I love the subtle yellow of the wild primrose. Most of my primula flowers are currently being eaten by snails. Beautiful cyclamen - I planted some that never appeared, we have squirrels so that might well be why! Good idea to plant while in flower then.

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    1. I've planted some cyclamen before and they disappeared, so I'm not sure whether these will escape, but I've tried a different location and I'm hoping for the best.

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  4. When I was out on a big walk this week and saw the wild primroses I thought the same, you just can't beat them! Fabulous snowdrop display. Good luck with the cyclamen. :)

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  5. I like the stone trough ( #2) in which there are the primroses. These are the kinds of things I would need to find for my garden : a large one.
    Regarding tomatoes, I will start my sowing soon .... indoors of course!

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    1. We ask for garden centre vouchers for Christmas, and spend them on the stone pots for the garden. My tomatoes are also in the warm, on the kitchen windowsill.

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  6. A very nice view of the swathes of snowdrops. The cyclamen is a beauty - I hope the squirrels leave it alone. I started off with one or two primrose plants and they have seeded themselves around quite happily. You've reminded me that I should make a start on my tomato seed sowing.

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    1. The weather is miserable here, and at least seed sowing can be done indoors.

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  7. The primroses look beautiful in your urn - sometimes the simple flowers are the best. Ditto the snowdrops and your carpet looks so amazing already. I have not sown any seeds yet and with the cold forecast I'll hold off another week. I like the varieties of tomato you have chosen. Yum!

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    1. I sowed them on Monday, and they have just started to germinate, including the out of date ones. I think they'll be happy on the kitchen windowsill for a while.

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