IT SNOWED

It snowed this week.  Not such amazing news to those of you who live in colder climes, but something that doesn't happen here every year.  Although it's presence has put paid to all outdoor gardening activity, it does clothe the garden in a new and different guise.




1. The Swiss Alps

These snow dusted yews and pines grow either side of the drive.  Given that there is no hope of a holiday at present, can I be forgiven for dreaming for a moment that I am in the Swiss Alps when I look at this scene? 


2. Yukimi

And this Maple tree and its little acer companion, transport me to Japan for a little Yukimi (snow viewing).  How beautifully each branch is outlined in white.




3. The Rose Garden

And after every trip away (even imaginary ones), arriving home is always a pleasure, and it is a pleasure to see the Rose garden dusted with snow.   It has rather slowed down progress on the rose pruning though.




4. Pieris

Yet despite the cold weather, these Pieris have their buds ready for action once Spring arrives.


5. Compost


The wintery weather does mean that heavy jobs like turning over the compost heaps can be tackled (by Mr Baileyana, thankfully). The compost moves along the three bays, finishing up at the far end.


6. Laid Hedge

The fields nearby are margined with traditional hedgerows.  Part of our garden has one of these old hedges dividing it.  Now leafless, the shapes of the branches are revealed; the horizontal 'laid' trunks and their vertical branches.



That's all from my garden for this week.  I'm staying in and staying warm today, but hoping that milder weather is on its way.  As always, thanks go to The Propagator for hosting Six on Saturday.

Comments

  1. It's all looking very pretty in the snow. I read about layering hedges in a book by James Redbanks, English Pastoral. He tries to farm more sustainably up in the Lake District, and describes doing this with his children to stop cows from finding gaps in the hedge and wandering off in the hills! Interesting to see it chez vous.

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    1. It seems that hawthorn naturally wants to grow straight up and not send out lateral branches, so it seems like the only way to get it thick at the base.

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  2. I always think laid hedges are very clever. Your garden looks lovely in the snow. We've not had any here which is sort or disappointing but also sort of a relief!

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    1. It's gone now so I managed to get some gardening done today. Lovely while it lasts, but wouldn't want it around for too long!

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  3. I also noticed that the pieris is ready for the spring shoots. There shouldn't be any night frosts that hit the tender leaves so beautifully coloured with pink-red…
    Very nice photo # 2. We also had snow this morning but everything melted. Now the rain is coming back

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    1. The new shoots were hit by the frost last year. I hope this year they manage to escape.

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  4. What great pictures. I especially like the Yukimi one with the snow dusting the tree. And the hedge looks fantastic. I once tried to lay a hedge and it is a little harder than I thought getting the cuts right.

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  5. The laid hedges are so beautiful - you're lucky to have one. You've also taught me a new word this week Yukimi. The Japanese are so good at tuning into nature and the seasons. I think they have a word for forest bathing too don't they?

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    1. I love their idea of picnicking under the flowering cherry trees, although in news photos of that it seems very crowded, like Bournemouth beach on a hot day.

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  6. Gertrude Jekyll, an avid photographer, used recommend studying black and white photographs of the garden in winter as it revealed the structure without the distraction of colour - the snow is to be appreciated for that alone! But ,still, we don't want too much of it!

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