EARLY JANUARY IN THE GARDEN

There are a few spring flowers beginning to appear.  I think they are more eagerly anticipated than any others in the garden.  It has been cold and frosty and yet their arrival declares that the days are getting longer and that there is much to look forward to.

1. Pulmonaria

This pink pulmonaria is a reliable harbinger of Spring.  It was one of the plants that was here when we moved in, and it quietly sits by the side of the drive and needs no looking after.  

2. Snowdrops

I have to be careful where I step in the woodland now.  The grass is carpeted with snowdrops starting to push their way up. This little fellow has been pushed out of the ground altogether.




3. Helleborus orientalis

Many of the oriental hellebores are in bud.  I was hoping they might manage to flower in time for this week's blog, but it wasn't to be.



4 Eranthis hyemalis - the Winter Aconite


Also just about to spring into flower are the Winter Aconites.  I've spent some time clearing away the fallen leaves and twigs so that they can be seen better, but I'm sure I have some more patches still hiding that I've not yet rediscovered.



5. Asarum europaeum

This little evergreen occupies a dry and shady spot under some yew trees.  I bought it because I saw it in a Gertrude Jekyll planting plan for a green border.  In fact a bought three, because that always seems like a good compromise between buying one (not enough of an impact) and buying five (too extravagant).  Although one died off quite quickly, the other two have now spread and joined up, but still not enough to make any sort of a splash.



6. Rose pruning

A few years ago I went on a Rose pruning day at David Austin roses.  They start pruning their roses after Christmas and finish by the middle of February.  I've made a start  - 6 down, 100 odd to go.




That's all from my garden for this week.  Thanks, as always, go to The Propagator for hosting Six on Saturday.


Comments

  1. That Pulmonaria is lovely. Every year I intend to get a few Pulmonaria for my shady border and every year I forget. I've turned the page of a Sarah Raven catalogue down with a white variety and it's going on my order. Good luck with the rose pruning!

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    1. Thanks Graeme. I've got some of the white Pulmonaria, which flower later than this one. It's very nice too and has the spotted leaves.

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  2. I really get it re buying 3 of any plant as a compromise, then we have to play the long game and wait for them to spread. You've got lots of dainty little things popping up. I especially like the winter aconites (I planted some a while ago and they all disappeared without a trace).

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    1. It's a shame they disappeared. These were here already, but they don't seem to spread.

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  3. It's interesting that you give the information on the David Austin roses pruning. The pruning from December to mid-February is therefore earlier than me who usually does this in March. So I think I will follow your advice soon!

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    1. On the course they said that the cold won't harm them, but late pruning March/April can weaken them.

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  4. I am impressed by your photograph of the Pulmonaria. The light is perfect and captures the lovely, silky hairs on the bracts (not sure if that's the right word?). The winter aconite and ginger (?) are lovely, subtle groundcovers. As the ginger spreads, it will supply a lovely, scaly texture and the leaves are so delightfully glossy.

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    1. Thank you. There was a lovely bit of sunshine for a short while!

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  5. So much already happening in your garden! The Aconites are going to be a real show...a plant that wouldn't be at all happy in my garden.
    A hundred roses mean a great deal of pruning.

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    1. It takes a while. I'm a big rose fan, but I'm trying not to buy any more.

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  6. I had to go and look at my Pulmonaria but it’s still in tight bud. Lovely Six

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    1. This pink one is much earlier than the others in the garden.

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  7. Peculiarly, I grow Asarum europeum in deep shade and in what is probably the dampest spot in the garden and it has (almost unseen) grown to make a good spread over the years and it winning the battle with a patch of Geranium nodosum, something that is quite an achievement.

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