CRIMSON AND GOLD

Walking around the garden on Friday afternoon, it was the deep red, the crimsons and the golds that caught my eye.  So this week there is richly Autumnal colour theme to my post.  First up are a pair of Periscarias.


1. Persicaria 'Son of Firetail'


2. Persicaria 'Red Dragon'




3. Penstemon

I love, love, love this plummy purple penstemon.  Well it's actually four plants in a group, so that they make a little more impact.




4. Crimson and Gold in the Long Border

Looking both ways, the Long Border is predominantly crimson, and the other way is all autumnal golds, the fallen ash leaves adding to the ochre pallet. 






5.  Pyroclastic Acer

The volcanic flow gets larger every year, but I can't bear to prune it.  I wonder how large these can get?




6. Cordyline in flower

This one is not in my garden, but in my parents.  I thought it merited a wider audience.  To me, it falls into the 'I can't believe you can grow that in our climate' category.  Amazing!




That's all from me for this week.  Thanks, as always, go to The Propagator for hosting Six on Saturday.


 

Comments

  1. Lovely colours. I'm going to look up Persicaria and then see where one could be squeezed into the garden...

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    1. I've found that tend to be quite robust plants (ie spread easily) so they are good for a poor spot where other plants would sulk.

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  2. That acer great and it's made me wonder if I would prune it if it were mine. I visited Japan 18 months ago and there is no way any self respecting Japanese gardener could leave it unpruned. They have itchy secateurs and do manage to create some amazing shapes.

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    1. Those Japanese gardeners are amazingly skilled.

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  3. That is a very nice penstemon. I need to add to my varieties.

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  4. That maple will never be pruned! LOL We have one similar in shape here, A. p. 'Dissectum', planted over 30 years ago and now it has grown completely across a pathway, blocking it. My four-year old grandson went up the path last weekend only to be stopped in his tracks and when I explained that it was Nanny's tree and that she wanted it that way, he said, "Cut it, Paddy!" No, it will never be cut.

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    1. I appear to have been and "Unknown" - I thought I had signed in etc. Anyway, by way of clarification, the comment is from Paddy Tobin, an Irish Gardener!

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    2. Hi Paddy. Luckily it could grow another couple of foot without being a problem, but after that it might need a rethink.

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  5. I've been adding to my deepest penstemons. Yours is (are) beautiful, Mrs. Bailey! And that maple -- volcanic flow, indeed.

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  6. Amazing acer ! It's a beautiful specimen : Leave it like that without pruning... like you I'm wondering how it will go...

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  7. I agree with Fred, what a wonderful display from your Acer.

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  8. The Long Border is still looking stunning. Long may it continue. The acer is fabulous! If it was mine I probably would give it a tiny haircut along the bottom to lift the foliage off the ground, but no more than that. The flower on the cordyline is a sight to behold!

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    1. It would definitely look more elegant slightly lifted from the ground.

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