ASTERS

Last year at about this time I visited Norwell Nurseries in Nottinghamshire.  In the previous week's post I featured some of the plants that had come from there.   It then occurred to me that ALL the plants I had bought from there had not only survived but had grown!  This, I felt, made a compelling reason for a return visit.

1. Aster 'Dark Desire'

This photo was taken in my garden of the plant I purchased last year. It's a fabulous colour and tall (5'5"), but it's tall columnar habit means it can live quietly at the back of the border.  Then come October,  it begins to flower and it announces its presence.

Aster 'Dark Desire'

2. Asters and Sedums at Norwell

The nursery is owned by Dr Andrew and Helen Ward, who propagate the plants themselves and are on hand to offer advice on varieties and growing requirements.  You can wander round their garden, looking for inspiration, and then find the plant you admired and buy one to take home. It is a lovely place, as I hope you will agree from the photographs.


Asters and Sedums at Norwell Nurseries

In this second photo, the border also contains some red and orange dahlias, and is as full of flower as any herbaceous border in the height of Summer.



3. Malus Golden Hornet

Another border at Norwell Nurseries is backed by Malus Golden Hornet.  This tree is dripping with yellow fruit and growing beneath its branches are asters in shades of deep pink, lilac and yes - that is 'Dark Desire' again on the left.



No prizes for guessing what comes next....




That's right - it's the shopping bit.

4.  Aster Blue Heaven

This was bought to accompany the Heleanthus Lemon Queen that I got from Norwell last year.  It is a combination that I saw growing in their garden, and this blue against the yellow looked wonderful.



5 Aster Amethyst Kylie

I was rather taken by the dark stems on this one.  The flowers are small and delicate. It's quite a tall variety, which I'm intending to plant behind the roses, where I'm hoping it will complement the last of their blooms.



6. Aster Ice Cool Pink

This is another one to pop in with the roses.  It has a greener, fern like leaf and is smothered in little pale pink flowers.



That's all from me for this week.  It's a  wet weekend here, ideal for hunkering down indoors,  so do visit The Propagator where you'll find plenty of gardening Six on Saturday's to read.




Comments

  1. Norwell Nurseries looks like a cracking place to visit. 'Dark Desire' is a rather good name for a plant and sums that aster up perfectly.

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    1. There are so many places called nurseries that turn out to be garden centres which buy in their plants. This is the real deal.

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  2. What lovely asters - ‘Dark Desire’ is one I haven’t seen before. Very striking.

    Perhaps by next year I’ll have achieved a border full of autumn colour, though I suspect it might be ‘some colour’ and not ‘full of colour’ We’ll see. The nursery looks a lovely place to visit and I’m sure you must have enjoyed strolling round.

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    1. Best of luck with your border of autumn colour. It sounds a lovely project.

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  3. There is nothing quite like seeing a mature plant in situ, to make a correct decision is there?

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    1. Particularly when it's growing in the same climate and soil as your own garden.

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  4. Asters are really autumn flowers ... I love these flowers! Many sizes, many colors ... and they last a long time. Thanks for sharing.

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  5. Smart nursery folk! I buy more if I see how a plant looks mature and in bloom. I buy things I'd never even considered buying!

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  6. A good nursery is worth its weight in gold, and that one seems to be a gem! Wish I could find Dark Desire here.

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    1. I think Dark Desire might be one they've bred themselves, so is probably only available mail order from them.

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  7. Something rang a bell so I looked up Norwell in the Plant Heritage National Collection Directory and it turns out they have collections of Astrantia and Chrysanthemums. Plus all those Asters. That really does sound like it would be worth a visit, though it's hardly a day trip from Cornwall.

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    1. Perhaps a bit far for a day trip. I'm going to try to go there more frequently and see their other specialities too.

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  8. lovely, i have become a big fan of asters, particularly those that can resist the dreaded mildew. i have several now that i've bought. they also are very enthusiastic in my garden, requiring division to control, but free plants, what's not to like?

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