IRIS, LUPINS AND LABURNUM



Another lock down week goes rolling by.  All this time at home has enabled me to establish the following;

1. that even with plenty of time in the garden there will still be weeding I won't get done.
2. there will still be plants hanging around waiting to be planted, and
3. I will still walk past the same shrubs that I've been meaning to prune and they still won't have been pruned.

But lawns have been edged, roses have been fed and there are plenty of flowers and good things to eat to look forward to.  I have plenty to choose from for this Six on Saturday since the planting in the Knot Garden is designed to look its best in May.  I may in fact, have cheated a little and sneaked in an extra picture. 


One side of the Knot Garden is mainly purples with a touch of blue in them.  Lupins and Iris are the mainstays of the borders, with a variety of supporting players. 




1. Pale Yellow Iris

Mixed in are some pale yellows to lighten the mix.  These Iris are pale yellow I promise you, despite the photo making them look a bit peachy. 



2. Iris Ma Mie

Many of the Iris have been acquired from here, there and everywhere and the only names I have are ones I've assigned to them.  However, a couple of years ago I treated myself to some Iris from the French nursery, Cayeux.  These Iris are one of theirs and they are called Ma Mie.   It's a variety from 1906 and has smaller flowers than some of the modern varieties.  It is very delicate looking.


3. Pink Border

On the other side of the Knot Garden, the colours are pinks and dark reds.  I grew the lupins from seed.. They are mostly three year old plants and a good size.  



4.  Iris Allington

This Iris was in the garden when we moved in, and therefore has a name I've given it.  I've propagated loads of these by breaking up the rhizomes and replanting them.  Iris take very easily.  If you do give it a go, cut the leaves in half before you replant them as it stops wind rock.


5. Clematis Marie Boisselot


I'm finishing with a couple of plants that aren't in the Knot Garden.  First is Clematis 'Marie Boisselot'.  She's flowering her socks off on this sunny wall. 



6. Laburnum


I feel like I ought to like Laburnum. The bees certainly love it.  The flowers are as elegant as wisteria, and unlike wisteria it doesn't need endless pruning.  Unlike some other flowering trees (Paulownia I'm looking at you) it is generously furnished with flowers. It's just that the colour is a little harsh.  I think it looks best photographed against a dark background.  





That's all from my garden this week.  There's plenty of lovely gardens and beautiful plants to give you inspiration for your own garden on The Propagator who kindly hosts Six on Saturday.

Comments

  1. Wow, your garden is looking fabulous! Love the iris, and your borders are so full and floriferous. Beautiful.

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    1. Thanks Gill. I have to admit there are gaps in the borders too, but that's the great thing about SoS. I can just pick out the best bits.

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  2. Superb Laburnum ! Wow!
    I also like the second iris ( 'Ma mie' > it's old french and it means "my love" but sweet words a man says to his wife )

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    1. That's such a sweet name. Thanks for the translation Fred.

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  3. That clematis is beauty...off to read more about her.

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  4. Wait, wait, wait! You have a knot garden? Do you have a post about it? Pictures? What's the link? I am currently obsessed with them! I love your purples and yellows, they are so perfect together.

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    1. I'll post more about it next week. It's in it's early stages. The hedges have not quite grown together yet (only planted two years ago), and I will have to wait a few more years for the topiary to look like much.

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  5. Well it doesn't seem to matter whether you get round to doing everything on your list or not. Your garden is doing just fine.

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    1. Thank you. I did find some thistles growing in that border that were huge. Luckily I like a bit of weeding!

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  6. Your irises are fabulous especially #4. You have so much colour in your lovely garden.

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  7. 1. 2. And 3. I relate to all of those!

    The Knot Garden is stunning, yes, mainly purple, but with gentle splashes of yellow, lime, white and of course, green. I have no talent for putting together a border, and I admire anyone with the skill to do that.
    The lupins and tulips sweep together through your pink border, I would love to be able to achieve that effect.

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    1. The lupins and tulips are planted in drifts as recommended by Gertrude Jekyll. They are quite long thin lines and seem quite odd when you first plant them up. It is effective though.

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  8. i have lupin envy. i grew some from seed last year, they were quite good, but only one of them has developed into a good robust plant. whenever it occurs to me i might buy a couple everywhere seems to be sold out. hmmph.

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    1. All mine were grown from seed, but they are funny old plants. I've had a couple go 'blind' - loads of leaves but no flowers, and others just fail to come up after the winter (including one which looked just like Lupin Masterpiece which I was really peeved about).

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  9. Your garden looks fantastic. I love the yellows and blues and that iris (no. 2) is beautiful. You made me chuckle about walking past shrubs you mean to prune and still haven't!

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