MID FEBRUARY IN THE GARDEN

I had hoped to get many projects underway in the garden this week.  The weather has continued to be mild, but it has been wet and windy, so all in all, the opportunities for getting outside have been limited.  When we have had a dry few hours, the soil has been too sodden to do much gardening.

But not to worry, one thing we know about the weather, is that it is changeable.  Hopefully I will be able to get underway with those projects sometime soon.

Meanwhile, this is what the garden has to offer this week.

1. Water, water everywhere ...

Opening the curtains last Sunday morning, where usually we would expect to see fields, there was  water.  



I've featured the snowdrops for the last few weeks, and here they are again, only this time in a pool of floodwater.


2. Crocus Prins Claus


Beautiful feathered deep purple flashes are overlaid onto a white flower.  The leaves have a fine white stripe to them.  Supposedly planted to provide a swath of early colour in the central borders of the knot garden, they are not swathing, but they have at least survived.


3. Narcissus Pseudonarcissus

This is our native wild daffodil and is supposed to be easy to naturalise in grass.  I've planted these in the orchard over the last two years.  Only a few have opened so far, with plenty still to come.   I was rather taken with these two which had cuddled up together.



4. February Gold

These have opened up in full this week.  I planted them in the woodland to follow on from the snowdrops.  Although they are called February Gold, it has been a pleasant surprise to find that they are actually in flower this early.  


5 Spruce cones

High, high up hang these cones.  I'll put my hands up - I'm not great on tree identification but I think this is a spruce, though I'm happy to be corrected.



6 Pink Pulmonaria

This plant was in flower on the 11th January and it's still going strong, but now accompanied by a scattering of snowdrops and some arrow shaped cuckoo pint leaves.  All I can say is that one man's weed is another man's wild flower.



That's all from my garden this week.  If you'd like to hear from other gardeners about what's happening in their gardens , then visit The Propagator, who kindly hosts Six on Saturday.  

Comments

  1. Your group of pulmonaria and snowdrops is lovely, and that is an amazing group of subaqua snowdrops. I hope it doesn't get any worse for you and things dry up quickly. This weather is certainly testing our garden plants!

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    1. I think the weather is testing us gardeners too!

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  2. It's certainly a spruce; which one is trickier. It looks a bit weeping, maybe one of the weeping forms of Norway spruce? So much water, hope that clears up soon. Very glad I don't have that to contend with.

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    1. Thanks for the help with the spruce ID. It does weep - and I'd made a guess at Norway spruce, so I think that's the answer. The water has subsided now, but the ground is too wet to work. They've just had a local farmer on the news saying he's been unable to sow his wheat this spring because of the condition of the soil.

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  3. Sad to see all your lovely snowdrops in floodwater! I hope it doesn’t kill any of them off.

    Beautiful flashes of colour on the crocus - they look quite striking, and hopefully they’ll provide you with swathes in time.

    The February Gold are like little yellow stars sitting amongst the snowdrops. Beautiful!

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    1. As far as I know snowdrops are happy in the wet, so they should be OK.

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  4. ��good luck with the floods .. I hope you haven't lost anything in your garden ... a few weeks to dry the soil and everything will be ready for a beautiful spring

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    1. I think all will be well and the weather should perk up soon.

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  5. Those crocus are very striking and the combination of daffs and snowdrops is lovely. I hope the floods recede quickly.

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    1. Thank you. The floods have gone thankfully, and I hope we will soon be back to normal.

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  6. The daffs and the snowdrops are lovely, a shame about the crocuses, they really have had a hard time this year being battered by storm after storm. It does look very wet around you!

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  7. Crocus Prins Claus is a stunner. Hope the flood water doesn't cause you too much of a problem.

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    1. The water round the snowdrops has drained away, but the lawns and borders are all very soggy still. It's only annoying because there are jobs I want to get on with. It's not going to do any real harm.

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  8. I have a big backlog of jobs to do in the garden. Getting intimidating, and my garden is a lot smaller than yours, I suspect. Hope the waters recede soon.

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    1. Thank you. I hope you have some time to get on with your jobs too. At least the evenings are getting lighter, which helps.

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  9. Those crocus are pretty wow. Do they show up well, being that dark? I'd think so, w/the white, but wondered from a distance if they did. How crazy, the flooding in your snowdrops! Wow, what a change a week or so makes.

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    1. You can see the crocus from a distance but they aren't as noticeable as the paler colours. The weather is very changeable. We've had a beautiful dry sunny day today, and now it's sleeting.

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