A FEBRUARY GARDEN MISCELLANY

Despite my optimism that this bad weather cannot last much longer, it does seem that we have another wet and windy weekend ahead of us.  Not every day has been gloomy though.  There was some mid week sunshine.  The flowers know it's Spring and along they come regardless.

1. Double daffodils

There are a few clumps of these double daffodils near the apple trees.  They come along reliably early each Spring.   

I believe that these are Telamonius Plenus, also known as Narcissus Van Sion, a variety which dates back to 1620.  It's an untidy looking flower, with some parts a deeper yellow than others.  Is it possible these have been growing here since the 17th century?




2. Lavender Crocus

I'm always intrigued by such survivors from gardens long ago.  I wonder to myself  who planted them and when.  Small groups of Crocus in lavender, white and purple appear in the Rose Garden at this time of year.  There were no flower beds here when we arrived.  Were there some in the past?  Did a Victorian gardener plant them in their borders, or was it a 'low maintenance' gardener from the 1970's who put them in to brighten up an expanse of lawn?



3. Kniphofia

In the long border are Kniphofia.  Catalogue descriptions of Kniphofia state that they flower in late Summer.  Mine flowered in June last year and despite dead heading didn't flower again.  I've bought a couple of different varieties to try this year, to see whether these will flower any later.  


As part of my drive to reduce plastic in the home and garden, I ordered these from Great Dixter nurseries.  They take the plants out of the pots before packing and wrap them in newspaper and compostable bags.  They even arrived in a reused cardboard box.


4. New Toy

I've been bought a new toy this week and I've been busy turning these branches into wood chips.  The branches have been blown down in the recent windy weather and the wood chips have been used as mulch under shrubs and hedges.



I've also cut down the herbaceous perennials in the long border and they've all been shredded too and added to the compost heap.  

5. Tomatoes

My tomato seeds have germinated.  I could have shown you a picture of the seedlings, and no doubt I will one week, but for today you get a photo of the seed packets instead.  This also shows that it's not all shopping at Great Dixter, and that I do have a more frugal side. I haven't grown Black Russian before, but the others are packets from previous years.


 Obviously I'll be hoping to free up the kitchen work tops soon, by moving them out into the greenhouse,  and on that topic ......

6. The Greenhouse

It's looking a bit full for this time of year, to be honest.  Quite a lot of spring bulbs are still in here.  There are alliums, tulips, leucojum aestivum and cyclamen.  All waiting for me to plant them out.




But I can't face turfing these out just yet to battle against the S and S's.  I'm going to admire them in all their un-nibbled prettiness for a little while longer.


That's all from my garden this week, but if you'd like to see more from gardens in the UK and beyond, then please visit The Propagator.  If you'd like to take part in Six on Saturday yourself, then all the instructions you need are there.

Comments

  1. Your daffs look a lot like my Rip van Winkle with their shaggy heads. You seem to be much more proactive than I am at the moment, I have lost all my gardening mojo with this interminable rain. But my cyclamen have been outside all winter and are still flowering! Such cheap and cheerful plants. And not bothered by the S&S unlike my fritillaria imperialis which once again appear to have been nibbled.

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    1. It's very hard to find any gardening mojo with this weather. I'm trying to find things to do, but it's getting harder when the soil is so wet.

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  2. I really like those shaggy daffs, whatever their name & whenever they arrived. I was surprised your Black Russians weren't cherry tomato - I got a collection a various tomato seeds last year, those being among them. Checking my records, they were full sized tomatoes, listed as 'irregular' sized fruit. The reason it's good for me to keep records - my brain leavers a lot to be desired. Are the large plants in the left of Photo 6 allium? They're gargantuan! I would've thought they were leeks. Can't wait to see those in bloom.

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    1. You're right - they are alliums, and they look like they are getting a bit squashed in those little pots by now.

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  3. That's a healthy looking Kniphofia and lovely to hear it's plastic free packaging. Mine arrived wrapped in wood shavings and paper but still in the pot. I always reuse the pots for seedlings so all good. I look forward to seeing your pokers in flower.

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    1. I look forward to seeing your ones too - it will be interesting to compare varieties.

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  4. My greenhouse is also cluttered with alliums, I managed to get 60 in the ground today, only another 120 odd to go! Good grief...

    You'll enjoy your shredder, excellent compost heap fodder maker.

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    1. Thankfully I've not got as many as you, because I don't know when I'm going to get the chance to plant them out.

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  5. Envious of the new toy! Those crocuses are very pretty indeed.

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    1. I'm actually enjoying clearing up all the fallen branches just so I can shred them.

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  6. The Telamonius Plenus is unusual, though attractive. Together with the crocus, it appears that your garden may have an interesting hisoty attached to it. My husband would love a chipper - maybe one day he'll get one. I won't show him yours though... ��

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